From: Homeland Security News Wire
To: Scott Jenkins,
Subject: Breaking News: 75 CDC scientists may have been exposed to anthrax
Date: Thu Jun 19 22:00:56 MDT 2014
Body:
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Thursday, 19 June 2014
Anthrax
As many as 75 CDC scientists exposed to anthrax after violation of handling procedure

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said earlier today (Thursday) that as many as seventy-five scientists working in CDC laboratories in Atlanta, Georgia may have been exposed to live anthrax bacteria after researchers deviated from established pathogen handling procedures. The exposure occurred after researchers working in a high-level biosecurity laboratory located at the CDC's Atlanta campus failed to follow proper procedures to inactivate the bacteria. They compounded this initial error by moving the samples, which may have included live bacteria, to lower-security CDC labs not equipped to handle live anthrax. Scientists working in the lower security lab do not wear the protective gear necessary when handling live anthrax bacteria.

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Bioweapons
Scientists urge U.S. to do more to detect, prevent use of bioweapons

Carefully targeted biological weapons could be as dangerous as nuclear weapons, so the United States should invest more resources in developing technologies to detect them, scientists say. What is especially worrisome is that "The advent of modern molecular genetic technologies is making it increasingly feasible to engineer bioweapons," says one expert. "It's making people with even moderate skills able to create threats they couldn't before." There is another worry: "A high-tech bioweapon could cost only $1 million to build," the expert adds. "That's thousands of times cheaper than going nuclear. Iran's centrifuges alone cost them billions."

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