From: Homeland Security News Wire
To: Scott Jenkins,
Subject: Combatting terror recruiting | Ebola model's woes | Blackout robot
Date: Fri Sep 26 13:12:55 MDT 2014
Body:
Homeland Security News Wire Home  | About us  |  Subscribe  |  Advertise  |  Contact
view counter
DAILY REPORT
Friday 26 September 2014 vol. 8 no. 222

In Today's Issue

Terrorism
New DOJ pilot program aims to deter Americans from joining terrorist groups

Boston, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis will host the Justice Department's (DOJ) pilot program aimed at deterring Americans from joining terrorists groups, particularly those fighting in Syria and Iraq under the Islamic State (IS) and Somalia under al-Qaeda-affiliated al-Shabaab. The program will rely on prevention and intervention initiatives.

U.S. strategy for fighting ISIS includes outreach to Muslims-American communities

The White House is planning a summit in October to consider domestic extremism – a summit which will include Muslim faith-based organizations, mental health providers, social services groups, and youth-support organizations. The leaders of U.S. security services agree that Muslim-American communities should be seen as the “front lines” against the efforts of terror groups to recruit impressionable youth.

view counter
DHS
Departures, vacancies continue to hobble DHS

The rate of senior level departures at DHS has increased in recent years, and some say that as a result, the department is unable to stay ahead of emerging threats, including potential terrorist and cyber incidents. According to the FedScope database of federal employees administered by OMB, between 2010 and 2013, departures of permanent DHS employees increased by 31 percent, compared to a 17 percent increase for the entire federal workforce.

Ebola
Models of Ebola spread cannot model people’s behavior

The most effective way to limit the spread of the Ebola virus is by tightly quarantining infected individuals in hospitals, Ebola treatment units (ETUs), or in their homes. The developer of a sophisticated model to predict the pace and scope of the spread of Ebola admits that the most important variable -- predicting the most effective way to convince infected individuals to report their cases to health authorities and be admitted to a quarantined facility, or even just stay at home – is beyond the model’s reach. “The trouble is to get people to believe that going to the hospitals is in their best interest,” said CDC’s Dr. Martin Meltzer. “We’ve got to get people to understand that. You can go around to villages and cities and slums all you want and say, ‘If you’re ill, go to the hospital.’ Why should anybody believe? We can’t model that.”

view counter
Power recovery
Blackout? Robots can help

Big disasters almost always result in big power failures. Not only do they take down the TV and fridge, they also wreak havoc with key infrastructure like cell towers. That can delay search and rescue operations at a time when minutes count. Now, researchers have developed a tabletop model of a robot team that can bring power to places that need it the most. In addition to disaster recovery, their autonomous power distribution system could have military uses, particularly for Special Forces on covert missions.

Food security
Irish teens win Google Science Fair prize for using bacteria to improve crop yields

Three high-schoolers from Cork County Ireland have won the top prize at this year's Google Science Fair for their project that demonstrates a way to germinate seeds faster using bacteria as a seed treatment. The group found that all of the seeds treated with bacteria sprouted on average 50 percent faster than those that were left untreated, which, the team reports led to an increase in harvest amounts of some of the oats by as much as 70 percent.

Energy
New approach can change climate negotiations

Researchers argue that the most important recent innovation in the discussion over how to slow down global warming is the adoption of a “cumulative emissions” approach to emissions of carbon dioxide. The researchers say that though, in the short term, this promises to challenge negotiators trying to achieve a meaningful international climate change agreement, in the longer term it ought to help them focus on the things that matter most. The virtue of using the cumulative emissions approach is clarity: By finding a simpler way to express the overall scale of the problem, the approach – and the IPCC and Calderón reports -- give governments and other players less room to pretend that opportunistic or short-term tweaks to emissions paths are sufficient to meet the goals they have set themselves.

Also noted

Fukushima, Japan rocked by two earthquakes in one hour; epicenter near nuclear plants | Cuomo says terror threat spurs higher security presence | New DHS headquarters "a monument to mismanagement" | Congress sails past airport hell under special TSA program | New "Bash" software bug may pose bigger threat than Heartbleed | CACI wins Department of Homeland Security's $212 million contract | The Department of Homeland Security is not prepared for a pandemic

view counter
view counter
BIOMETRICS | BORDERS | Business | Cybersecurity | Detection | Disasters | Government | Immigration
Infrastructure | Public health | Public Safety | Sci-Tech | SECTOR REPORTS | Surveillance | Transportation
Homeland Security News Wire Home | About us | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact

Forward email


This email was sent to sjenkins@utahsenate.org by hsnewswire@newswirepubs.com |  

Homeland Security News Wire | 200 Old Country Road | Suite 200 | Mineola | NY | 11501