From: Adrian Saenz, White House Deputy Director Intergovernmental Affairs
To: Scott Jenkins,
Subject: President Obama Takes Steps to Help Working Families
Date: Fri Jun 27 19:23:19 MDT 2014
Body:
The White House Friday, June 27, 2014
 

White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs Update

Welcome to the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs state update. In this week's update, President Obama hosts the White House Summit on Working Families, the Administration issues its one year report on the progress made in advancing the President's Climate Action Plan, and the President travels to Minneapolis to meet working mom, Rebekah.

Keep an eye on your inbox, check out the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs website, and follow us on Twitter at @DavidAgnew44 for more information.

President Obama Takes Steps to Help Working Families

President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the White House Summit on Working Families, at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C., June 23, 2014

President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the White House Summit on Working Families at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C., June 23, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

On Monday, the White House, in partnership with the Department of Labor and the Center for American Progress, hosted a Summit on Working Families with the aim of having a national conversation and set a concrete agenda to bring American workplaces into the 21st century.

At the summit, President Obama announced a set of concrete steps that will create more opportunities for hardworking families to get ahead that includes:

  • Expanding workplace flexibility and empowering workers
  • Increasing access to affordable child care
  • Making progress toward solutions for paid leave
  • Continuing to close the pay gap by increasing access to non-traditional occupations
  • Expanding tax credits that support working families
  • New private sector efforts to bring solutions to more workplaces

You can watch the President's remarks at the event and check out the full fact sheet of announcements and commitments.

Our Climate Action Progress: One-Year Report

President Barack Obama delivers remarks on climate change, at Georgetown University

President Barack Obama delivers remarks on climate change, at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. June 25, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

The effects of climate change are already being felt across the nation. In the past three decades, the percentage of Americans with asthma has more than doubled, and climate change is putting those Americans at greater risk of landing in the hospital. The impacts of extreme weather events - from more severe droughts and wildfires in the West, to more powerful hurricanes and record heat waves - are hitting communities across the country. These changes come with far-reaching consequences and real economic costs.

At the same time, clean energy represents a significant economic opportunity, and we know we can meet this challenge in a way that advances our economy, our environment, and public health at the same time.

That is why, this week last year, President Obama announced his Climate Action Plan - a comprehensive plan to cut carbon pollution, prepare the United States for the impacts of climate change, and lead international efforts to combat global climate change.

One year later, the Administration has made real progress in advancing the goals in the President's Climate Action Plan. The policies President Obama has put forward in just one year - when implemented - are expected to cut nearly 3 billion tons of carbon pollution between 2020 and 2025. That's an amount equivalent to taking more than 600 million cars off the road for a year.

You can read the full progress report here.

The President Travels to Minneapolis, Minnesota

This past March, a mom from Minneapolis named Rebekah wrote the President a letter about the increasing costs of taking care of her family. She told him about her day-to-day struggles, and let him know what she thinks needs to change.

This week, the President traveled to Minnesota to spend time with her.

That's because Rebekah's experience is representative of the experience of millions of Americans across the country right now. Even though our economy has undoubtedly made a comeback, too many folks are still stretched too thin.

We want to make sure you see what the President sees, too.

Meet Rebekah and learn more about her story here - and follow along all to see updates and highlights from the President's day with her.

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We welcome your thoughts and feedback at iga@who.eop.gov.

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