From: Homeland Security News Wire
To: Scott Jenkins,
Subject: More unaccompanied children enter U.S. | Transporting hazmat | Better facial recognition
Date: Mon Jun 09 11:04:48 MDT 2014
Body:
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DAILY REPORT
Monday 9 June 2014 vol. 8 no. 132

In Today's Issue

Immigration
Sharp increase in the number of unaccompanied children crossing into U.S.

DHS' Office of Immigration Statisticsreports that U.S. Border Patrolagents apprehended 30,000 children traveling alone illegally across the Mexican border in 2013. The Border Patrol expects to arrest as many as 90,000 children this year, and about 142,000 children in 2015. The Office of Management and Budgethas notified the Senate Appropriations Committeethat the increase in the number of children crossing the border alone would cost the government at least $2.28 billion, about $1.4 billion more than the Obama administration had budgeted for in its Unaccompanied Alien Childrenprogram.

Bergdahl exchange
States have consistently negotiated with terrorists to get back their citizens

The prisoner exchange with the Taliban has been met with criticism from some quarters, but, in fact, there is nothing unique about it, as the record shows that states around the world do negotiate with terrorists in order to get back their citizens or advance other goals. For example, since the early 1980s, Israel has freed nearly 8,000 Palestinian terrorists, and Palestinian and Arab prisoners, for fewer than twenty Israelis -- soldiers and citizens who were held captive by Hezbolla and Hamas, and the bodies of several dead Israelis soldiers Hezbollah held as bargaining chips. Experts say that arguments can be made for or against theBergdahl exchange on its merits, but what cannot be argued is that the exchange should not have been made because it involved negotiations with terrorists.

Hazmat
Feds, rail operators, Washington State embroiled in crude oil shipment disclosure dispute

Last month the U.S. Department of Transportation(DOT) ordered rail carriers with trains carrying crude oil to notify state officials in the states through which the trains pass about the volume, schedule, and routes of these trains. The amount of crude oil transported by trains has grown dramatically – from 6,000 carloads in 2005 to more than 400,000 carloads in 2013. The increase in the volume of crude oil shipping has been accompanied by a sharp rise in the number of accidents and derailments. DOT’s order was meant to allow states’ first responders to be prepared, but the railways treat shipping information as "security sensitive" and refuse to share it with states’ officials unless the information is distributed to emergency response groups for planning purposes only. Washington State says that state laws require that such information be made public.

Biometrics
Improved performance of facial recognition software

Who is that stranger in your social media photo? A click on the face reveals the name in seconds, almost as soon as you can identify your best friend. While that handy app is not quite ready for your smart phone, researchers are racing to develop reliable methods to match one person’s photo from millions of images for a variety of applications.

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Cybersecurity
Six more bugs found in popular OpenSSL security tool
By Robert Merkel

OpenSSL is a security tool that provides facilities to other computer programs to communicate securely over the public Internet. OpenSSL is also used in some common consumer applications, such as software in Google’s Android smartphones. So when the Heartbleed vulnerability in OpenSSL was discovered and widely publicized in April this year, system administrators had to rush to update their systems to protect against it. Computer system administrators around the world are groaning again as six new security problems have been found in the OpenSSL security library.

Security guards
Security guard industry lacks standards, training

Despite playing a more important role in the wake of 9/11, the security guard industry remains plagued by inadequate training and standards in many states, new study of the $7 billion-a-year industry finds. Formal training of the nation’s one million-plus private security officers is widely neglected, a surprising finding when contrasted with other private occupations such as paramedics, childcare workers, and even cosmetologists.

Homeland Security, Criminal Justice, Law & Public Policy - Master of Science Legal Studies 100% online - CALU Global Online
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Fire retardants
All-natural mixture offers promising fire retardant

What sounds like fixings for a wizard’s potion -- a dash of clay, a dab of fiber from crab shells, and a dollop of DNA-- actually are the ingredients of promising green fire retardants invented by NIST researchers. Applied to polyurethane foam, the bio-based coatings greatly reduced the flammability of the common furniture padding after it was exposed to an open flame. Peak and average rates of heat release -- two key indicators of the magnitude of a fire hazard -- were reduced by 48 percent and 77 percent.

Also noted

We should negotiate with terrorists. We always have. | U.K. liquid bomb plotter planned to go to Syria on stolen passport | Terrorism insurance pits NFL and NHL against Tea Party | Terror suspect may be 'lone wolf' | Grid protection must be a priority | Thousands of prisoners have been exchanged by Israel, Colombia and others | South Dakota gets millions in homeland security grants, but where does it go? | Terrorism task forces mesh federal, local authorities | Why we still can’t afford to fix America’s broken infrastructureDecrepit dams could spell disaster in the U.S. | Tap geothermal power to restore the Salton Sea | U.S. carbon regulations may spur new nuclear capacity in long term: S&P | France says Syria chlorine gas samples may be inconclusive

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Homeland Security, Criminal Justice, Law & Public Policy - Master of Science Legal Studies 100% online - CALU Global Online
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Progress and Modernity in Arab Societies
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