From: Homeland Security News Wire
To: Scott Jenkins,
Subject: Inadequate airport perimeter security | Recalibrating Secure Communities | Nuclear waste
Date: Wed May 28 12:37:41 MDT 2014
Body:
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DAILY REPORT
Wednesday 28 May 2014 vol. 8 no. 122

In Today's Issue

Airport perimeter security
Airports resist bolstering perimeter security because of cost

Last month's security breach at Mineta San Jose Airport, in which a teenager entered the airfield and hid in the wheel well of a Maui-bound flight, has highlighted concerns about the security of airport perimeters. Perimeter intrusions are common at airports, but airports resist pressures to improve perimeter protection because of the costs involved. Experts note that if we were to string all of the U.S. airport perimeters together, we would approach the length of the U.S. border with Mexico and security expenditures approaching a billion dollars. These experts say that airports are not likely to invest heavily in perimeter security until a serious disaster due to lax perimeter security occurs. "Show me a body count, and we'll build a fence," said one airport administrator.

Immigration
U.S. recalibrating Secure Communities

The number of municipalities cooperating with Secure Communities has grown from fourteen in 2008 to more than 3,000 today, and about 283,000 immigrants have been deported under the program between 2008 and April of this year. More and more municipalities, however, refuse to hold undocumented immigrants in jail on behalf of Secure Communities.DHS chief Jeh Johnsonsays Secure Communities needs a "fresh start,"and President Barack Obama is planning to limit deportations to undocumented immigrants who have been convicted of violent crimes.

Nuclear waste
U.S., industry grappling with a growing nuclear waste problem

Thirty years ago congress voted to fund the building of centralized nuclear waste repository at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Four years ago to Obama administration pulled to plug on the project, and nuclear wasted has continued to accumulate on the grounds of nuclear plants – active and shuttered – around the United States. As of May 2013, the U.S. nuclear industry had 69,720 tons of toxic nuclear waste to deal with. The administration strategy calls for a short-term centralized storage facility by 2025, and a permanent national geological repository by 2048.

Chemical weapons
New compound offers protection against chemical weapons

Researchers have discovered that some compounds called polyoxoniobates can degrade and decontaminate nerve agents such as the deadly sarin gas, and have other characteristics that may make them ideal for protective suits, masks or other clothing. The use of polyoxoniobates for this purpose had never before been demonstrated, scientists said, and the discovery could have important implications for both military and civilian protection. A UN report last year concluded that sarin gas was used in the conflict in Syria.

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Killer robots
Robot warfare raises ethical question

Remote-controlled drones could one day give way to automated robot forces. With the increasing use of drones in military operations, it is perhaps only a matter of time before robots replace soldiers. Whether or not fully automated war is on the immediate horizon, researchers say it is not too early to start examining the ethical issues that robot armies raise.

Energy
Algae biofuel can help meet world energy demand

Microalgae-based biofuel not only has the potential to quench a sizable chunk of the world's energy demands, researchers say. Microalgae produces much higher yields of fuel-producing biomass than other traditional fuel feedstocks and it does not compete with food crops. The researchers say that algae yields about 2,500 gallons of biofuel per acre per year. In contrast, soybeans yield approximately forty-eight gallons; corn about eighteen gallons.

Homeland Security, Criminal Justice, Law & Public Policy - Master of Science Legal Studies 100% online - CALU Global Online
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Also noted

Fired Y-12 guard wants vindication, says he did his job to detain protesters | Nuclear regulator the ONR accused of ‘indefensible’ conflict of interest | Plutonium plant's missteps still loom large | World Cup 2014: inside Rio's Bond-villain mission control | Engineers, others working to codify data gleaned from 2011 Joplin storm | North Carolina’s crumbling infrastructure far more costly once it caves in | Will Canada be ready for the next natural disaster? | How the government became the single biggest employer of unauthorized immigrants | Prospects unclear for narrow immigration bill | British Islamists in Syria responsible for terrorism and torture | Florida man facing trial for terrorism charges asks to wear traditional Arab clothing in court | Muslim group takes next step in libel suit against Canada's P.M. Stephen Harper | Three people arrested for terrorist plot in Norway | Canadian terrorist, who was a senior Hezbollah member, killed by Syrian rebels | Auction results place Exelon power plants in jeopardy

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Homeland Security, Criminal Justice, Law & Public Policy - Master of Science Legal Studies 100% online - CALU Global Online
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Progress and Modernity in Arab Societies
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