From: Homeland Security News Wire
To: Scott Jenkins,
Subject: PreCheck extended to international airlines | Extending TRIA | Modernizing biodefenses
Date: Fri May 09 13:12:42 MDT 2014
Body:
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DAILY REPORT
Friday 9 May 2014 vol. 8 no. 107

In Today's Issue

Aviation
TSA expands PreCheck screening program to international airlines

The TSA is expanding its PreCheckscreening program to passengers on international airlines. Air Canada is the first international carrier to join the list of PreCheck carriers, which already includes several U.S. airlines.Some international airlines are reluctant to join the PreCheck carrier list because it entails upgrading their computer systems to print a PreCheck logo and embed PreCheck data in their boarding pass barcodes. With Air Canada joining the list, the TSA believes other foreign carriers with a large U.S. passenger base would benefit if they offered PreCheck status to their customers.

Israel-Palestine
Court dismisses case against U.S. charities supporting West Bank settlers

U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman has ruled that plaintiffs describing themselves as residents of “Occupied Palestine” cannot proceed with claims that five U.S.-based organizations have funded attacks against Palestinians. The thirteen men and women -- two Americans, ten Palestinians, and one Greek -- argued that a portion of the territory where they reside is “within the internationally recognized borders of the future Palestinian state."Furman deemed the allegation "entirely conclusory."

Terrorism insurance
Industry, Democrats reject GOP-sponsored TRIA-extension draft

House democrats and members of Property Casualty Insurers, a leading insurance trade group, have rejected a Republican-sponsored draft proposal which would alter some measures of the current Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA). The Property Casualty Insurers did not mince words, calling the GOP plan “unworkable for the marketplace.” The proposal would raise the amount of damage caused by a terrorist attack from the current $100 million to $500 million before government coverage is triggered (the higher threshold would apply to attacks which do not involve nuclear, biological, chemical, or radiological means).

Biodefense
New biodefense centers offer modernized approach, face criticism

A new facility at Texas A&M University is one of three new biodefense centers created by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to revolutionize the way fatal viruses are countered in the event of an emergency. The $286-million lab features mobile clean rooms that can be detached and moved to form different production or testing systems as the need arises. Not everyone agrees that the design and capabilities of the new center would offer the best response to biothreats.

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First response
Teleoperated robots for smarter disaster response

Electrical engineers have developed telerobotics technology which could make disaster response faster and more efficient. The researchers aim to combine existing “smart” technologies better to serve society during disaster and crisis response. This includes using teleoperated robots for rescues and safety operations; a high-tech dispatch system that gathers information from cameras and sensors and pushes it out to first responders; drones for damage surveillance and rescues; and vests outfitted with sensors and GPS tracking to be worn by search-and-rescue dogs.

Detection
Using light to detect trace amounts of explosives

Researchers may help in the fight against terrorism with the creation of a sensor that can detect tiny quantities of explosives with the use of light and special glass fibers. The researchers describe a novel optical fiber sensor which can detect explosives in concentrations as low as 6.3 ppm (parts per million). It requires an analysis time of only a few minutes.

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Food security
Farmers try to cope with the challenges posed by extreme weather

Across the country, farmers are reporting that they are at yet another critical juncture for agriculture. Citing more unpredictable and severe weather due to climate change, scientists are researching defensive measures and looking to previous agricultural challenges for inspiration. Some are looking to the way individual farmers and government agencies addressed the Dust Bowl hardships of America during the Great Depression as a source of inspiration.

Also noted

Defense authorization bill boosts cybersecurity | DHS funds cybersecurity risk management strategy | Wisconsin Department of Justice remains mum on cell-tracking surveillance | Abu Hamza denies backing terrorism | Lodi-area terrorism suspect nearly released on bail | Feds reject California IDs for illegal immigrants | Feds: Schools can't shut out undocumented immigrants

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Homeland Security, Criminal Justice, Law & Public Policy - Master of Science Legal Studies 100% online - CALU Global Online
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Progress and Modernity in Arab Societies
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