From: Homeland Security News Wire
To: Scott Jenkins,
Subject: Terror victims win Iranian-owned NYC building | U.K. Syria's threat | Plutonium processing
Date: Mon Apr 07 11:05:06 MDT 2014
Body:
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DAILY REPORT
Monday 7 April 2014 vol. 8 no. 81

In Today's Issue

Terrorism
Federal judge: terrorism victims may seize Iranian-owned $500 million mid-Manhattan tower

Federal Judge Katherine Forrest on Friday ruled that the Iranian companies which own the 650 Fifth Avenue building in Manhattan must forfeit the property – evaluated between $500 and $700 million -- to victims of terrorism who hold billions of dollars in judgments against Iran. The claimants include families who lost relatives in the 9/11 attacks and the 1983 Beirut bombing, in both of which Iran was implicated. The Iranian owners have vowed to appeal, but legal experts say the building assets could possibly be distributed while the challenge is pending.

Hundreds of Britons are terror-training in Syria, making attack on U.K. “inevitable”

Thousands of foreign fighters, including hundreds of Britons, are now in Syria, fighting with rebel forces against the regime of Bashar al-Assad. Security experts say that the danger faced by Britain and other countries from jihadist fighters returning from Syria is "unprecedented," and that a terror attack on British soil by one or more British Muslims returning from Syria is "inevitable.” “All the reports I have seen suggest that it is becoming increasingly acute," said Gilles de Kerchove, the EU's counterterrorism coordinator. "National budgets devoted to counter-terrorism are declining across the EU. Yet the threat that we face is becoming more diverse, more diffuse, and more unpredictable."

Encryption
Inspired by nature, researches develop “unbreakable” security codes

A revolutionary new method of encrypting confidential information has been patented by scientists who have been inspired by their discoveries from human biology, which model how the heart and lungs coordinate their rhythms by passing information between each other. A mathematical model based on the complex interaction between these organs has now been transferred to the world of modern communications.

Defense technology
DARPA launches Biological Technologies Office

DARPA has established a new technology office -- the Biological Technologies Office (BTO) -- which will merge biology, engineering, and computer science to harness the power of natural systems for national security. With the establishment of the new office last week, biology takes its place among the core sciences that represent the future of defense technology.

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Plutonium processing
Alternative strategy for uranium processing at Oak Ridge

A group of twenty-five experts referred to as the Red Team, assigned to review alternatives to the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have reached a “strong consensus” on what could be an alternative strategy, but will spend the next two weeks polishing their work before presenting it to National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Red Team was instructed to design a way to move uranium processing from Building 9212, Y-12’s Second World War-era center for processing highly enriched uranium, by 2025 and at under $6.5 billion.

New group formed to monitor Savannah River Site, nuclear waste issues in SE U.S.

Savannah River Site Watch (SRS Watch), a new public-interest watchdog group, was launched last week in what it said was a response to the need for increased monitoring of the nuclear projects carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The group says it has been formed to focus on an array of nuclear projects now underway at Savannah River Site (SRS), the sprawling 310-square mile complex located near Aiken, South Carolina.

Homeland Security, Criminal Justice, Law & Public Policy - Master of Science Legal Studies 100% online - CALU Global Online
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Infrastructure protection
Bangladesh tops list of countries at risk from sea level rise

Scientists say that see levels may rise by up to the feet by 2100.The implications of this would have drastic consequences for nearly all coastal nations, but the consensus is that Bangladesh will be the hardest hit by the change. Leading Bangladeshis say that since Bangladesh produces less than 0.3 percent of the emissions driving climate change, it would unjust for Bangladesh to rely on its own meager resources to solve this problem. One solution they offer: fifty million Bangladeshis (out of a population of 163 million) should be allowed to move to and resettle in the countries which produce the bulk of greenhouse gasses.

Energy
More stringent climate policies mean hard choices for coal plant operators

Limiting climate change to 2°C means shutting down coal power plants -- an unpopular proposition for coal power companies. A new study shows, however, that delaying climate policies could prove even worse for power plant owners. The reason: new power plants being built now, especially in China and India, are built to run for 30-50 years, paying off only after years of operation. Stringent climate policies, however, could make the cost of emission so high that coal power generation is no longer competitive, leaving new power plants sitting idle and their owners and investors with huge losses -- a problem known as stranded capacity.

Also noted

2 New Jersey towns contesting audits on Sandy aid | How Southern California learns from one earthquake to prepare for the next | GOP lawmakers oppose lifting visa restrictions on Libyan students | Feds to manage Piketon uranium enrichment project overseen by a company that filed for bankruptcy last month | About half Syria's chemicals packed for removal, violence halts convoys: U.N. | New security system finally complete at Los Alamos | GAO: Missile interceptor production should await proven redesign

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Homeland Security, Criminal Justice, Law & Public Policy - Master of Science Legal Studies 100% online - CALU Global Online
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Progress and Modernity in Arab Societies
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