From: Sutherland Institute
To: Michael McKell,
Subject: Medicaid expansion: the moral question
Date: Fri Jan 09 23:25:42 MST 2015
Body:
Sutherland Institute

Hello Mike,

The question of if, when, and how to expand Utah’s Medicaid program is important on multiple levels. But right now let’s focus on the moral level.

Our moral impulses and reasoning will not allow us to sit by and let people suffer needlessly, and history has shown that if civil society and the marketplace are unwilling or unable to step up to provide basic health care for everyone who needs it, the government will.

Hence we have one of Utah’s more conservative governors in recent memory proposing to expand Utah’s Medicaid program under the rules of Obamacare, in the form of the Healthy Utah plan.

But the way the plan is set up means that Utahns currently on Medicaid would end up with worse access to health care.

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