From: Christel S
To: Kevin Van Tassell, David Lifferth, Kraig Powell, Aaron Osmond, Dana Layton, Brian Greene, Menlove, Martell, Board Education, Patrice Arent, Mark Madsen,
Subject: HB 342 Please Pass for Education Liberty, Quality and Local Control
Date: Fri Feb 21 15:40:02 MST 2014
Body:
Please Pass HB 342.    This is why:
 
                Common Core: 101

ARE COMMON CORE STANDARDS LOCALLY CONTROLLED?

No.They are under copyright by an unelected, private D.C. group called NGA/CCSSOwhich has reserved the legal right to alter them.

DOES COMMON CORE PREPARE STUDENTS FOR COLLEGE?

Not for a 4-year university. It minimally prepares students for the non-collegiate workforce or for non-selective community colleges.

A keyCommon Core creator, Jason Zimba,saidthat the Common Core can prepare students for non-selective colleges but that it does not prepare students for STEM careers. He said: “I think it’s a fair critique that it’s a minimal definition of college readiness… but not for the colleges most parents aspire to…Not only not for STEM, it’s also not for selective colleges. For example, for U.C. Berkeley, whether you are going to be an engineer or not, you’d better have precalculus to get into U.C. Berkeley.”

DO THE COMMON CORE STANDARDS IMPROVE K-12 EDUCATION?

They are an unpiloted experiment so nobody knows. People who are financially invested in Common Coresay yes to the question, while people who aren’t financially interested, and who study and analyze the Common Core standards,say no.

Dr. James Milgram (Stanford University emeritus professor who served on the Common Core validation committee) reported:

I can tell you that my main objection to Core Standards, and the reason I didn’t sign off on them was that they did not match up to international expectations. They were at least 2 years behind the practices in the high achieving countries by 7th grade,and, as a number of people have observed, only require partial understanding of what would be the content of a normal, solid, coursein Algebra I or Geometry. Moreover, they cover very little of the content of Algebra II, and none of any higher level course…They will not help our children match up to the students in the top foreign countries when it comes to being hired to top level jobs.“

Dr. Sandra Stotsky (University of Arkansas emeritus professor who served on official Common Core validation committee and also refused to sign off on Common Core) said:

As empty skill sets, Common Core’s ELA standards do not strengthen the high school curriculum. Nor can they reduce post-secondary remedial coursework in a legitimate way. As empty skill sets, Common Core’s ELA “college readinessstandards weaken the base of literary and cultural knowledge needed for authentic college coursework,decrease the capacity for analytical thinkingand completely muddle the development of writing skills.”Full testimony here.

 

 

DOES COMMON CORE REALLY TAKE AWAY MOST OF THE TRADITIONAL CLASSIC LITERATURE AND NARRATIVE WRITING?

Yes. Although it does not specify which classic books cannot be read, the Common Core contains a chart that explains that in fourth grade, studentsmust cut their classic/fiction reading to 50%. By twelfth grade, students must reduce their classic/fiction reading to 30% with informational text taking up 70% of the time spent reading.

Grade

Literary

Information

4

50%

50%

8

45%

55%

12

30%

70%

WHAT IS INFORMATIONAL TEXT?

Informational text is anything that used to belong mostly in other subjects. It is now taking70% of high school seniors’ English class readings, in the form of scientific writings, political writings; opinion pieces; almostanything other than classic novels, poetry, plays or other fictional works.

WHY DON’T COMMON CORE PROPONENTS WANT STUDENTS TO LEARN MUCH MATH?

It costs money to educate beyond minimal workforce training. Inthis 2013 document put out by the NCEE (National Center on Education and the Economy) we learn that it’s not important under Common Core to have high educational standards in high school; it’s seen as a waste of time to educate the high school graduates past Algebra II.They’re pushing for an emphasis on the lowest common denominator, while deceptively marketing Common Core as a push for “rigorous” academics.

Read these Common Core proponents’ lips: “Mastery of Algebra II is widely thought to be a prerequisite for success in college and careers. Our research shows that that is not so… Based on our data, one cannot make the case that high school graduates must be proficient in Algebra II to be ready for college and careers. The high school mathematics curriculum is now centered on the teaching of a sequence of courses leading to calculus that includes Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus and Calculus. However, fewer than five percent of American workers and an even smaller percentage of community college students will ever need to master the courses in this sequence in their college or in the workplace… they should not be required courses in our high schools. To require these courses in high school is to deny to many students the opportunity to graduate high school because they have not mastered a sequence of mathematics courses they will never need. In the face of these findings, the policy of requiring a passing score on an Algebra II exam for high school graduation simply cannot be justified.”

The report goes on to say that traditional high school English classes, with their emphasis on classic literature and personal, narrative writing, is useless. The report says that Common Core will save students from the irrelevant classics with a new emphasis on technical subjects and social studies via the dominance of informational text:

The Common Core State Standards inEnglish Language Arts (CCSSE) address reading in history/social studies as well as science and technical subjects, and in so doing mayincrease the relevance of high school instruction.”

In calling classic literature and personal writing irrelevant, these Common Core proponents underscore the idea that job prep matters, but not the pursuit of wisdom or knowledge.

WHY DID ALMOST EVERY STATE IN THE U.S. DROP THEIR EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS, WHETHER LOWEROR HIGHER, TO ADOPT COMMON CORE STANDARDS?

Proponents saythat the reason was to improve education.Opponents saythat it had nothing to do with education; that the standards were adopted without analysis or any vetting because the adoption was offered by the federal government under time pressure, in exchange for a chance at large federal grant monies calledRace to the Top. Even those states that applied and won no money (like Utah) stayed with Common Core, because there were manyother federal reasons and incentivesto do so.

WILL THE COMMON CORE STANDARDS REMAIN AS THEY ARE TODAY?

No. Common Core’sofficial sitesays: “The Standards are intended to bea living work: as new and better evidence emerges, the Standards will be revised accordingly.” There’s no way for the governed to revise the document by which they’ve agreed to be governed.

WHY DOES THE STATE SCHOOL BOARD SAY WE’RE FREE TO CHANGE THEM?

States can’t delete anything. We can add –a tiny bit.A Common Core 15% rulesays: ”A State may supplement such standards with additional standards, provided that the additional standards do not exceed 15 percent of the State’s total standards”

(This rule is repeated in the federal waivers from No Child Left Behind, in the Race to the Top Assessments Grant application, in documents of both PARCC and SBAC testing groups, and in the implementation guide of Achieve, the group contracted to create Common Core.)

WILL THE CREATORS OF COMMON CORE CHANGE THESE STANDARDS WITHOUT OUR APPROVAL?

Yes.Common Core’s official sitesays: “The Standards are intended to bea living work: as new and better evidence emerges, the Standards will be revised accordingly.” There’s no invitation for the governed to revise.

IS THERE AN AMENDMENT PROCESS FOR VOTERS TO ALTER THE COMMON CORE?

No. When it changes, it will be changed by those who wrote them. (See official siteand #3 above.)

WHERE DO PROPONENTS GET THE NOTION THAT COMMON CORE WILL IMPROVE EDUCATION?

From believable, expensive marketing lines. Not from evidence.Opponents point outthat therewas never any field testing for Common Core standards; so this is a national experiment using virtually all children. Supporters never attempt to explainhoweducation is supposedly improved by Common Core, nor show a pilot state or pilot classroom where Common Core had been successfully used. Beyond the manypleasant-sounding and but words, there is no documentation or evidenceto back up any of theclaims that the standards are higher, nor the other claims such as “Common Core was internationally benchmarked” or “is rigorous” or “improves college and career readiness.” They are baseless advertising words.

Upon this lack of evidence we build our children’s futures.

ARE COMMON CORE STANDARDS FREE TO US?

No. The standards’ development and marketing was paid for primarily by Bill Gates. The Common Core tests for most states waspaid for primarily by the federal government.States pay countless millions for the rest of the Common Core Initiative: the re-training, new text purchases, aligned computer technologies, etc. They incorrectly say that these high costs would have been spent anyway, even without Common Core.

WAS THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT “HANDS-OFF” THE STATES’ ADOPTION OF COMMON CORE?

No. Secretary Duncanannounced and praised the release of the standards in 2010. He bribed states using Race to the Top grant money. Hecontracted with the testing groupsto micromanage the Common Core tests, in exchange for federal grant money.

DID THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BRIBE STATES TO ADOPT COMMON CORE?

Yes. States received federal ARRA money to implement pre-common core reformsthat paved the way for Common Core, including building aState Longitudinal Database System. There were 4 federal key objectives for education reformslaid out by President Obama which were the four conditions for receiving stimulus monies.Federally defined common standardsand tests were one of the conditions.

More evidence of bribery and coercion can be seen in the timing of a majority of the states’ adopting Common Core simultaneously with the Race to the Top money lure. And recently, a group ofU.S. Senators have denounced what the Executive Branch (Obama Administration) has done in coercing states with Common Core bribes.

IS COMMON CORE LEGAL?

No. Under the Constitution, education belongs to individual states. It is illegal for the federal government to interfere in the states’ right of making educational decisions. National standards are illegal. National data collection is illegal. And the General Educational Provisions Act prohibits the federal government from directing education –very, very clearly:

No provision of any applicable program shall be construed to authorize any department, agency, officer, or employee of the United States to exercise any direction, supervision, or control over the curriculum, program of instruction, administration, or personnel of any educational institution, school, or school system, or over the selection of library resources, textbooks, or other printed or published instructional materials by any educational institution or school system…
 
Thank you.
 
Christel Swasey
Heber City