From: NCSL TODAY
To: Dean Sanpei,
Subject: Nov. 20: How long should police be able to keep data from license plate readers?
Date: Wed Nov 20 15:51:52 MST 2013
Body:

NCSL TODAY brings you the latest news from the capitols.

TOP NEWS Nov. 20, 2013

License plate readers spark privacy, public safety debate

Stateline

Privacy advocates don’t object to police using license plate readers to catch criminals. But they are concerned about how long police keep the numbers if the plates don’t register an initial hit. In many places there are no limits, so police departments keep the pictures—tagged with the date, time, and location of the car—indefinitely.


States run the gamut in renewal of old health insurance policies

The New York Times

Just a few days after President Obama said that millions of consumers should be able to keep their old insurance plans for another year — even if they did not meet the requirements of his health care law — he is finding support among states that would not exactly be described as allies. Check out NCSL’s research on this topic.


Leak spurs talk of carbon monoxide monitors in schools

NCSL research cited by Associated Press


A gas leak at a Utah elementary school that sickened more than 40 people has prompted concerns about the fact that the state is among many that don't require schools to install carbon monoxide monitors. Check out NCSL’s research on this topic.


With legal marijuana taxes set, all eyes are on Colorado and Washington

Stateline

Washington and Colorado are set to provide a case study in the debate over legalization. That debate is expected to spread to other state legislatures next year – advocates have identified Rhode Island and Maine as potential targets – and also to foreign countries like Uruguay. Check out NCSL’s research on this topic.


Ohio House set to vote on 'stand-your-ground' law

Toledo Blade


The state House of Representatives could vote today on whether to make Ohio the 23rd state to have some version of a “stand your ground” law .   Check out NCSL’s research on this topic.

Iowa legislature could expand its budget and planning powers

NCSL review cited in Rapid City Journal

The Legislature’s Executive Board has voted to support a package of potential changes regarding the authority of the interim Joint Committee on Appropriations. Some of the changes affect the timing when the Legislature and its staff receive budget proposals from the governor. One big change would allow the interim JCA to hold budget hearings before the session starts each year.
NCSL TOP PICKS
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Out for Blood: Bed bugs, mosquitos spread misery, frustrate lawmakers
Like vampires, bed bugs feed on human blood, do their best work at night and are very hard to kill. Also like vampires—at least those on TV and movie screens— bed bugs have made a mysterious comeback in the past decade.

Who can initiate an ethics complaint?
One of the most important functions of an ethics commission is dealing with complaints of violations of ethics laws. Commissions vary on who can file a complaint. Depending on the commission, complaints can be initiated by the commission itself, individual ethics commissioners, public officials, staff, the general public or a combination. At least 44 commissions allow anyone to file a complaint, although some qualify the meaning of “anyone.”

Fall Forum: Ending partisan gridlock

Evan Bayh  former U.S. senator and Indiana governor and John Huntsman, former Utah governor, are the leaders of No Labels, a national organization working with members of Congress from both political parties to work across the aisle to solve our nation's problems. They will appear at a Fall Forum session dealing with ways to end partisan gridlock.



 
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